Natural disasters

We can prepare for them, but we can not prevent them. We can also anticipate them, but we can not accurately forecast them. Natural disasters are perhaps a lesson to mankind, proving that nature is master, not people who populate this planet.

1. ”Storm of the Century” – March 12-15, 1993

11 tornadoes, extreme winds, snow and torrential rains. All this formed in 1993 the “storm of the century”.
The meteorological phenomena covered a large area of the American continent, from Cuba to Canada. The damage caused by the storm amounted to $ 6 billion. Also, millions of people have been left without electricity, and 300 people have lost their lives.

2. Chile earthquake – May 22, 1960

It was not the most destructive or lethal earthquake, but it was definitely the strongest. With a magnitude of 9.5 degrees, with its epicenter in Valdivia, Chile, the 1960 earthquake remains the strongest ever recorded ever. Two million people were homeless, and 1,600 people died (although some sources estimate 5,700 deaths). Whole villages were covered by water after the earthquake triggered tsunamis in the area. The huge waves also affected Hawaii where they caused 61 deaths, and Japan with 138 deaths. Chile earthquake – May 22, 1960
It was not the most destructive or lethal earthquake, but it was definitely the strongest. With a magnitude of 9.5 degrees, with its epicenter in Valdivia, Chile, the 1960 earthquake remains the strongest ever recorded ever. Two million people were homeless, and 1,600 people died (although some sources estimate 5,700 deaths). Whole villages were covered by water after the earthquake triggered tsunamis in the area. The huge waves also affected Hawaii where they caused 61 deaths, and Japan with 138 deaths.

3. The Great Explosion of Nature in April 3-4, 1974

The most terrifying demonstration of nature consisted of 148 tornadoes that crossed 13 American states in just 24 hours. More than 5,000 people were injured and another 330 people lost their lives. The meteorological phenomenon is still the strongest in US history, the country that ranks first in the world in terms of the number of tornadoes it crosses.

4. Pompei 79 d.Hr.

The eruption of the Vesuvius volcano lasted for an entire day and covered the whole city with a thick cloud of ash. The volcano stayed active now. The last eruption took place in 1944 and caused the destruction of several nearby villages, as well as several American planes. Currently, Pompeii is one of Italy’s most important tourist attractions.

5. The eruption of the Krakatoa volcano – 26-27 August 1883

When it erupted in a series of four explosions in 1883, the Indonesian volcano Krakatoa released an amount of energy equivalent to that of an atomic bomb. The eruption of the volcano shook the whole of the Pacific causing the island to be sinking. The crater of the volcano reached the bottom of the ocean, causing a tsunami that covered 100 villages and nearby islands. Over 36,000 people died, most of the victims of the tsunami.

6. Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina was a hurricane that formed on August 23, 2005 during the Atlantic hurricane season of that year and caused massive destruction in the United States on the Gulf Coast. Most of the material damage and life losses were located in New Orleans, which was flooded after the dyke system in the area ceded. At least 1,836 people lost their lives due to Hurricane Katrina and the floods they followed.

7. Tsunami in the Indian Ocean – December 24, 2004

It all started with a very strong earthquake. With a magnitude 9.1, the earthquake in Sumatra was the third most powerful but also the longest earthquake in history. The tellurian movement lasted 8 minutes and caused vibrations across the planet at least one centimeter. That was just the beginning. The tsunami waves caused by the earthquake remain the most destructive ever recorded. They spread across 14 countries, killed nearly 230,000 people and left 1.7 million homeless people.

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